Resources for Responding to Hate/Bias at School

Resources for Responding to Hate/Bias at School

We’ve gathered resources that can help educators think overall about how to respond proactively (and preventatively) to hate and bias at school.

Responding to Hate and Bias at School (Teaching Tolerance)

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: This is a preparatory resource for all staff, particularly administrators, on monitoring school climate and responding actively to hate/bias incidents.

Responding to Hate and Bias at School (webinar version) (Teaching Tolerance)

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: see above.

Speak Up at School: How to Respond to Everyday Prejudice, Bias and Stereotypes (Teaching Tolerance)

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: Overall publication on how educators can respond to everyday bias incidents. Includes some age-appropriate response sentences teachers can use when students say hateful things, plus role-plays for such situations.

Speak Up at School (webinar version) (Teaching Tolerance)

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: see above.

Building Ally Behaviors: Free Online Course for grades 3-7 (Anti-Defamation League)

  • Grade Level: For teachers of grades 3-7.
  • Time Required: 20 minutes.
  • Materials Needed: N/A
  • Highlight: This is a free course for educators to “maintain a positive classroom environment that is safe and inclusive so all students can learn and thrive.”

When Hate is in the Headlines: Resources for K-12 Educators Webinar

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: This webinar from the American Federation of Teachers/Share My Lesson includes presentations from AFT, Teaching Tolerance, ADL and Facing History and Ourselves.

Sample anti-hate administrative language to start the school year:

https://connectdocs.blackboard.com/broadcasts/Docs/a29d1598024f9e87beab4b98411d48ce/1fd26d2e-3fc3-4681-97c3-18a8826f7ac0.pdf?ticket=t_Nt2yK8Z0&xythos-download=true

Note August 12, 2018: We are currently gathering models to share here. Please email micapollock@ucsd.edu with samples.

Sample administrative responses to hate incidents:

Note August 12, 2018: We are currently gathering models to share here. Please email micapollock@ucsd.edu with samples.

Sample Anti-Harassment Policy language:

Note August 12, 2018: We are currently gathering models to share here. Please email micapollock@ucsd.edu with samples.

Safe Zones Model Policy and FAQ (National Education Association)

Sample School Board Resolution & Policy on “Safe Zone” Immigration Safety

FAQS on “Safe Zone” School Board Resolution

Sample “Safe Zones” resolution for Higher Ed Institutions

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: sample policy language on protecting immigrant students particularly.

More professional development resources for ongoing, preventative anti-hate work

Mica Pollock, Schooltalk: Rethinking What We Say About--and To-- Young People Every Day (New York: The New Press, 2008).

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: Accessible and very concrete chapters, discussion questions, and dialogue activities to support educators thinking critically together about responding to common claims about students’ “groups,” opportunities, intelligence, communities, “cultures,” skills, everyday lives, and parents. Lots of THINK/DISCUSS questions to prompt dialogue and learning in school communities. Also usable with students in middle and high school. Requires getting a copy of the book.

Mica Pollock, ed., Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real about Race in School (New York: the New Press, 2008)

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: Short conversation starter essays and discussion questions to prompt dialogue about issues of race, diversity, and inequality in schools. Also usable with students in middle and high school. Requires a copy of the book.  

“When Are You Going to Come Visit?”: Home visits and seeing our students. (Elizabeth Schlessman, Rethinking Schools)

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: A teacher’s concrete discussion of home visits as a mechanism for ongoing learning and relationship-building in school communities.

Mara Tieken, “Making Race Relevant in All-White Classrooms: Using Local History,” in Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real About Race in School, ed. Mica Pollock (New York: The New Press, 2008). (Schooltalking)

  • Grade Level: K12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: Ideas for investigating local history, so students learn more about the complex, diverse communities where they live. Requires getting a copy of the book.

Teresa L. McCarty, “Evaluating Images of Groups in Your Curriculum,”  in Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real About Race in School, ed. Mica Pollock (New York: The New Press, 2008). (Schooltalking)

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: Tips for inviting guest speakers from local organizations for productive, respectful learning about local lives. Requires getting a copy of the book.

Leisy Wyman and Grant Kashatok, “Getting to Know Students’ Communities,”  in Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real About Race in School, ed. Mica Pollock (New York: The New Press, 2008). (Schooltalking)

  • Grade Level: K12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: Tips for productive, respectful community field trips --visits to neighborhoods, schools, homes, or community organizations that help students learn about people’s rich lives. Requires getting a copy of the book.

Identity, Race and the Classroom - Parts 1 & 2 Webinar

  • Grade Level: K-12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: This webinar from the American Federation of Teachers/Share My Lesson includes resources from the AFT and Facing History and Ourselves.

Niobe Way. (Note August 2018: Will share when ready).

  • Grade Level: K12 educator professional development
  • Highlight: Tools for supporting students to interview peers/community members/elders to learn about people’s lives, skills, community contributions, migration experiences, and more.

More Extensive Curricular Programs to Keep Anti-Hate Learning Going

Check out other school-wide campaigns that can help create inclusive school environments, like these:

Mix It Up at Lunch (Teaching Tolerance)

Day of Silence (GLSEN)

No Name-Calling Week (GLSEN)

For Curriculum Development Over Time

Finally: Over time, explore the rich curriculum available from organizations like those below! Specific lessons from all of these organizations are also found on our #USvsHate Resource lists.

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